Category Archives: AN INTRODUCTION. TO THE ENGINEERING. OF FAST NUCLEAR REACTORS

Core-Disruptive Accidents — the Transition Phase

During the initiation phase the geometry of the core is reasonably intact. The prompt-critical excursion takes place so rapidly that there is no time for much movement. It is therefore relatively easy to calcu­late what happens by means of a code (much more complex that the simplified model described earlier) that couples transient neutronics with heat transfer and fluid mechanics, […]

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Monitoring of Impurities

The simplest and most effective means of monitoring impurity levels is a plugging meter, which measures the temperature at which solids are precipitated. Figure 4.7 shows the principle of a plugging meter. Sodium flows through an orifice, the pressure difference across which is monitored. As the sodium temperature is reduced the pressure dif­ference rises when impurities are precipitated. A plugging […]

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PHYSICS

1.1 INTRODUCTION 1.1.1 Physics and Design Whether the purpose of a fast reactor is to generate power, to breed fissile material, to consume fissile material or to consume nuclear waste products, whether its chain reaction is to be critical and self-sustaining or subcritical and driven by an external source of neutrons, reactor physics — the understanding of the nuclear reactions […]

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REACTOR PROTECTIVE SYSTEMS 5.2.1 Automatic Shutdown

The features described in section 5.1 are present whatever the details of the design. Protection is also given by systems designed deliberately to prevent accidents or to prevent them from causing damage. Very often protective systems serve the dual function of preventing injury to people (plant operating staff and the general public) by stopping the release of radioactivity, and of […]

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