Author Archives: admin

Waste form properties

Many properties need to be considered in waste form development. Mechanical properties are important from the point of view of material integrity in a storage or disposal environment. Of particular importance is the long-term chemical durability of the waste form as this will influence the release of toxic elements due to leaching under disposal conditions. Chemical durability can also change […]

Read more

Waste oils

Waste oils arising from the processing of alpha-emitting materials are prob­lematic as there is limited potential for disposal as solid waste. In the UK, small quantities of some of these wastes containing very low levels of radio­activity have been allowed to be disposed of via incineration at a commer­cial site (Environment Agency, 2004). However, the incinerator’s discharge consent of 80 […]

Read more

Pyrochemical wastes

In addition to the issue of treatment of surplus weapons grade materials, increased interest is being shown in the immobilization of special categories of waste arising from the pyrochemical reprocessing of Pu metal for weapons use. These differ from the wastes generated during the reprocessing of spent fuel as they can contain high concentrations of actinides together with substantial quantities […]

Read more

Russian wastes

The Pu recovery policy operated by Russia meant that in 1999 there were no substantial inventories of wastes containing >1% Pu (Jardine et al., 1999). Recovery of Pu from wastes led to the generation of waste streams contain­ing <200 ppm Pu which were suitable for cementation and near-surface burial. However, there are some HLW sludges which contain significant concentrations of […]

Read more

US tank wastes

In 1996 the first plant built in the US for vitrification of defence-related HLW, the Defence Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL), commenced operation. Unlike the British and French civil HLW vitrification plants, which operate using Inconel 601-lined induction furnaces, the DWPF operates a Joule-heated ceramic-lined furnace, as will the new facility, the Waste Vitrification Plant […]

Read more

Treatment and immobilization

As has been shown in Section 25.2, defence wastes can have an extremely large compositional range, varying from pure metal (i. e., Pu or HEU) through well-defined chemical compounds (e. g., oxides), to the liquid and semi-solid HLW tank wastes found at various separation facilities. Any treatment process must ensure that the ultimate waste form is intrinsically (passively) safe, leach […]

Read more

Nuclear safety and security

The safe storage and disposal of radioactive waste (RAW) is of paramount importance, with the goal being to convert nuclear wastes into stable solid forms which can be safely stored before permanent disposal in repositories, frequently not yet designed or built, which would serve the dual function of preventing the waste from entering into the biosphere and supporting non-proliferation. Although […]

Read more
1 2 3 4 5 2 591